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Jordan River

Planned water release from Utah Lake will create higher water levels for Jordan River

Higher Water Levels
Post Date:02/13/2020 1:31 p.m.
Jordan River5Water levels along the Jordan River will be higher than normal this time of year, so please use caution. The higher water levels are due to a planned water release from Utah Lake.
 
Salt Lake County Flood Control and Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities, in coordination with the State Engineer’s Office of the Utah Division of Water Rights, are implementing standard operational controls regarding flows within the Jordan River and Surplus Canal.
 
The operational controls consist of opening the head gate at Utah Lake on Feb. 14 to allow water to be released from Utah Lake into the Jordan River.
 
The Surplus Canal is a flood control facility operated by Salt Lake County, ultimately conveying water to Farmington Bay. The reason for the operational increase in flows to the Jordan River and Surplus Canal is to accommodate higher than average snowpack and higher than average lake and reservoir levels in Utah Lake, Deer Creek Reservoir and Jordanelle Reservoir.
 
As a result of this operation, flows in the Surplus Canal and portions of the Jordan River will be higher than normal for this time of year but will not be at levels typically seen during spring runoff.
 
The Jordan River north of 2100 South in Salt Lake City is not expected to experience higher flows. The Jordan River south of 2100 South will experience higher flows. Taylorsville is among the cities affected by these higher flows.

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 The Surplus Canal is a flood control facility operated by Salt Lake County, ultimately conveying water to Farmington Bay. The reason for the operational increase in flows to the Jordan River and Surplus Canal is to accommodate higher than average snowpack and higher than average lake and reservoir levels in Utah Lake, Deer Creek Reservoir, and Jordanelle Reservoir. 

As a result of this operation, flows in the Surplus Canal and portions of the Jordan River will be higher than normal for this time of year but will not be at levels typically seen during spring run-off. 

The Jordan River north of 2100 South in Salt Lake City is not expected to experience higher flows. The Jordan River south of 2100 South will experience higher flows. The cities affected by flows 

 The Surplus Canal is a flood control facility operated by Salt Lake County, ultimately conveying water to Farmington Bay. The reason for the operational increase in flows to the Jordan River and Surplus Canal is to accommodate higher than average snowpack and higher than average lake and reservoir levels in Utah Lake, Deer Creek Reservoir, and Jordanelle Reservoir. 

As a result of this operation, flows in the Surplus Canal and portions of the Jordan River will be higher than normal for this time of year but will not be at levels typically seen during spring run-off. 

The Jordan River north of 2100 South in Salt Lake City is not expected to experience higher flows. The Jordan River south of 2100 South will experience higher flows. The cities affected by flows 

 The Surplus Canal is a flood control facility operated by Salt Lake County, ultimately conveying water to Farmington Bay. The reason for the operational increase in flows to the Jordan River and Surplus Canal is to accommodate higher than average snowpack and higher than average lake and reservoir levels in Utah Lake, Deer Creek Reservoir, and Jordanelle Reservoir. 

As a result of this operation, flows in the Surplus Canal and portions of the Jordan River will be higher than normal for this time of year but will not be at levels typically seen during spring run-off. 

The Jordan River north of 2100 South in Salt Lake City is not expected to experience higher flows. The Jordan River south of 2100 South will 

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